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Bexley widow visits Westminster in campaign to fight against one of the deadliest forms of cancer

PUBLISHED: 13:04 14 March 2016 | UPDATED: 13:04 14 March 2016

Brain Tumour Research reception at The Speakers House, House of Commons, to celebrate the e-petition success.

Brain Tumour Research reception at The Speakers House, House of Commons, to celebrate the e-petition success.

Brain Tumour Research.

Rachael Cotton is part of the Nick Cotton Foundation

Luke Sinclair and Rachael Cotton at Brain Tumour Research reception at The Speakers House, House of Commons, to celebrate the e-petition success.Luke Sinclair and Rachael Cotton at Brain Tumour Research reception at The Speakers House, House of Commons, to celebrate the e-petition success.

A widow and her brother visited Westminster last week as they campaigned for better funding into brain tumour research.

32-year-old Rachael Cotton lost her husband to the deadly form of cancer, and now campaigns for the government to improve research.

Brain tumours currently kill more children and adults under the age of 40 than any other cancer, according to Brain Tumour Research.

But just one per cent of the national cancer research fund is spent on brain tumour research.

Mrs Cotton and fellow Bexley resident Luke Sinclair went to the speaker’s house on March 9 following the recent success of an online petition.

The petition, set up by Brain Tumour Research, called on the government and cancer charities to increase national investment in brain tumour research to be in line with other cancers.

According to the research group, the number of incidences and death from brain tumours is on the rise, with 16,000 people each year diagnosed with a tumour.

Gaining more than 120,000 signatures, the success of the petition means MPs will debate the funding issue in a House of Commons debate.

The siblings set up the Nick Cotton Foundation in honour of Mrs Cotton’s late husband, who died aged 30.

Their marriage was just six-months-old when Nick was diagnosed with an aggressive brain tumour in November 2012, despite treatment, he died.

Mrs Cotton said: “In the four good months we had whilst Nick was on the chemotherapy drug Avastin, we went to our friends’ wedding in Malta, to Spain and celebrated our 30th birthdays together with all our friends and family.

“It has given me some precious memories, but I lost my husband far too young, when we were just starting out on what should have been a long and happy marriage.

“We were shocked to find so few options available for patients with brain tumours and sickened to learn that the treatment for brain cancer is antiquated and barbaric, as cruel as the disease itself.”

Chief executive of Brain Tumour Research, Sue Farrington Smith said: “Many thousands of families continue to be shocked by the lack of treatments available and clinicians continue to deliver a poor prognosis, causing untold distress to patients and their loved ones.”

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