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Cops say sorry in extortion claim case

PUBLISHED: 15:28 13 November 2008 | UPDATED: 15:42 25 August 2010

EXCLUSIVE A VULNERABLE resident has received an apology after police dismissed his complaints of extortion, blackmail, burglary and harassment.

EXCLUSIVE

A VULNERABLE resident has received an apology after police dismissed his complaints of extortion, blackmail, burglary and harassment.

Victor Logan, 53, of Farmdale Road, Greenwich, suffers from clinical depression and felt suicidal after a conman tried to scam him into thinking his home had been repossessed.

The victim received a string of bogus demands for money in the Spring and August and even had a metal door put up over his own with demands for money pasted on it.

Despite complaining to the police, it was only when the Times started enquiring about the 'repossession' in October that the police accepted Mr Logan's story.

Before then, he was forced to block the metal door with glue and access his property through a window, playing a dangerous game of cat-and-mouse with the man trying to take over his property.

Mr Logan said: "I was worried about my safety as he kept on coming round wanting to get in.

"I felt the police were not taking me seriously. They just wanted to believe that I did not understand I had been repossessed."

Greenwich police even arrested Mr Logan on October 5 for trying to enter his own home, before calling his bank to discover he had not been repossessed.

Mr Logan was released, yet it was still only when contacted by the Times that the police investigated why Mr Logan's home had been mysteriously boarded up.

Chief Inspector of Operations, Richard Weaver said: "It is clear that, in this instance, police could have done more to assist Mr Logan.

"We deeply regret causing Mr Logan any distress and we apologise unreservedly if Mr Logan felt that his concerns were not taken seriously."

Amid a growing climate of repossessions caused by the credit crunch, the mental health charity MIND warned that vulnerable members of the public could be particularly at risk.

Maureen Robertson, director of Greenwich MIND, said: "Someone with mental health problems could well have committed suicide over this.

"I'm glad the police have apologised."

An investigation is now under way into Mr Logan's claims of blackmail and

extortion.

jules.cooper@archant.co.uk

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