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Cressida Dick to become first female Met Police commissioner

PUBLISHED: 14:57 22 February 2017 | UPDATED: 15:07 22 February 2017

File photo dated 03/01/12 of Cressida Dick, who is to become the first female commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, succeeding Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Wednesday February 22, 2017. See PA story POLICE Commissioner. Photo credit should read: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire

File photo dated 03/01/12 of Cressida Dick, who is to become the first female commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, succeeding Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Wednesday February 22, 2017. See PA story POLICE Commissioner. Photo credit should read: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire

the 56-year-old will return to the force after leaving for the Foreign Office two years ago

Cressida Dick has been named as the new head of Scotland Yard, becoming the first woman to hold the most senior post in British policing.

The 56-year-old will succeed Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe as Metropolitan Police commissioner.

Ms Dick will return to the force after leaving for the Foreign Office two years ago.

The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, congratulated Ms Dick, saying: “Cressida Dick will be the first female commissioner of the Met in its 187-year history, and the most powerful police officer in the land. She has already had a long and distinguished career, and her experience and ability has shone throughout this process. On behalf of Londoners I warmly welcome Cressida to the role and I very much look forward to working with her to keep our capital safe and protected.

“This is a historic day for London and a proud day for me as mayor. the Metropolitan Police do an incredible job, working hard with enormous dedication every single day to keep Londoners safe, so for me it was absolutely essential that we found the best possible person to take the Met forward over the coming years and I am confident that we have succeeded.”

Ms Dick came under intense scrutiny in 2005 when she was in charge of the operation that led to the fatal shooting of Brazilian Jean Charles de Menezes, who was wrongly identified as a potential suicide bomber.

A jury cleared Ms Dick of any blame in his death.

The new commissioner was widely seen as the leading candidate for the job after Sir Bernard’s retirement was announced last year.

Three other senior figures were also contenders - Mark Rowley, an assistant commissioner at the Met; Sara Thornton, the chair of the National Police Chiefs’ Council; and Stephen Kavanagh, the chief constable of Essex Police.

Ms Dick’s appointment means that all three top policing jobs in the UK are now held by women - the commissioner, head of the NPCC and National Crime Agency chief Lynne Owens.


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