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Disabled Bexley man’s cricket coaching courage to be recognised by Lord’s Taverners

PUBLISHED: 07:00 17 February 2020

Sam participating in the Lord'’s Taverners Super1s Disability Cricket programme in 2018. Picture: Lord's Taverners

Sam participating in the Lord'’s Taverners Super1s Disability Cricket programme in 2018. Picture: Lord's Taverners

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A disabled Bexley man who has dedicated part of his life to help others to transform their lives, is to be rewarded next month.

Sam is now a qualified level two coach. Picture: Lord's TavernersSam is now a qualified level two coach. Picture: Lord's Taverners

The work Sam Alderson does is being recognised by the Lord's Taverners.

It is one of 10 charity partners celebrating the power of sport to benefit society at an inaugural Sport Gives Back Awards event in London.

Sam, 28, has a rare genetic condition called TAR (thrombocytopenia-absent radius) syndrome, a blood disorder that disrupts clotting. He also does not have a radius bone in either forearm.

He is a wheelchair user but none of this has stopped him from first playing cricket, and most recently, coaching the game.

Originally a player as part of the Lord's Taverners Super 1s Disability Cricket programme, he is now qualified a level two coach.

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The charity said for Sam even making a cup of tea is difficult, but his determination to face life head on with a smile on his face makes him an inspiration for the cricket team he played with and now coaches.

It said he never gives up and is determined to help other young people by showing that if he can do it, so they can.

If cricket is a tool to change lives for the better, Sam is the embodiment of it.

Paul Robin, CEO of the Lord's Taverners, said: "Super 1s gives young people with a disability aged 12-25 the chance to play regular, competitive cricket. By creating community cricket hubs where young people can receive coaching, we give participants the chance to compete

against their peers and enjoy the benefits of playing sport.

"For many young people with a disability, loneliness has been identified as a major issue, and opportunities to take part in regular competitive sport can be extremely limited."

Sporting legend Lord Sebastian Coe is among the many guests invited to be at The Royal Institution in Mayfair, London, and he said: "When approached about the initiative to create an awards ceremony that celebrates the UK individuals and organisations that use sport to change lives, it immediately resonated with me."


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