September 21 2019 Latest news:

Pictures of Danielle Laber (pink top) and Sue Davies. Photo: Andy Barnes

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Factfile

Cervical cancer is the 12th most common cancer in women in this country and the third most common form of gynaecological cancer after uterine (womb) and ovarian cancer.

There were about 2,900 new cases diagnosed in the UK in 2010 – equivalent to eight women every day.

Six in 10 of all new cases are diagnosed in women under 50 years – about 1,700 cases each year.

Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women under 35 in the UK.

Overall, incidence in Britain decreased by nearly half between the late 1980s and the early 2000s, but the last decade has seen an increase of about 15 per cent, mostly in women in their late twenties.

Statistics from Cancer Research UK

Unlike Movember, when men are encouraged to grow sponsored moustaches for prostate cancer charities, in Fanuary women raise money by being waxed.

Gorgeous Nail and Beauty Emporium, in Old Bexley Lane, is donating money for every Brazilian and Hollywood “intimate” wax to Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust, the UK’s only cervical cancer charity.

Owner Sue Davies said: “We did it as a bit of a tongue-in-cheek thing with some regular clients last year so this year we thought we’d go for it.

“People do so much for breast cancer, which is great, but cervical cancer is difficult to spot and so many girls are affected by it.

“Hopefully this will raise some money and get women to get smear tests and look after themselves.”

The phrase “no pain, no gain” might spring to mind but Sue insists a new wax has made the procedure almost painless.

Although she did admit it takes more “bravery” than men who let their facial hair grow in Movember.

For the less daring, charity donations later in the month will also be made for all bikini waxes.

Sue thinks Fanuary could be unique, although a different initiative with the same name was started in America to benefit ovarian cancer.

She said: “As far as I know there are no others salon in the whole of the country doing it.

“We can’t get closer to it than we are and you do have some peculiar conversations.”

It coincides with Cervical Cancer Prevention Week, which runs until Saturday (25).

The week’s events will publicise information on the symptoms and causes of the disease and ways to prevent it and support us.

Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust estimates that just under 3,000 women a year are diagnosed with cervical cancer but 20 per cent of women do not take up opportunities for cervical screening.

Robert Music, Chief Executive for Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust said: “Our studies shows a clear need to educate women on the causes of cervical cancer and the purpose of cervical screening.

“If those who are delaying their screening continue to misunderstand the disease and how it can be prevented, then we are concerned that screening uptake will continue to fall and incidence will start to rise.”

Sue, 46, knows all too well the devastating impact the disease can have.

“One of my close friends died in August,” she said. “It was the day before my birthday.

“Our friend’s wedding was a few weeks after and she should have been there.”

Karen Jane Miller died just weeks after celebrating her 41st birthday, leaving her two children and husband.

Sue was inspired to raise money for the cervical cancer charity in her memory.

Daughter Aimee Miller, 17, said: “When we found out Sue was doing it for my mum, it was lovely.”

Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust estimates that almost 3,000 women a year are diagnosed with cervical cancer but 20 per cent do not take up opportunities for cervical screening.

Robert Music, chief executive of Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust, said: “Our studies shows a clear need to educate women on the causes of cervical cancer and the purpose of cervical screening.

“If those who are delaying their screening continue to misunderstand the disease and how it can be prevented, then we are concerned that screening uptake will continue to fall and incidence will start to rise.”

Sue, who worked in the NHS before she opened the salon two years ago, lives in Gravel Hill, Bexleyheath, with her two teenage children.

She hopes Fanuary, which is only being held at a handful of salons this year, will catch on across the country.

“We know we can change a lot of people’s lives and it’s quite a liberating experience,” Sue said.

“We’ve raised £100 so far. We haven’t got a target, but we’re just doing what we can.”

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