Search

Hurst Primary School pupils named runners up at National Young Mathematicians' Awards

PUBLISHED: 10:08 15 December 2015 | UPDATED: 15:48 15 December 2015

The Hurst Primary School team at the National Young Mathematicians' Awards

The Hurst Primary School team at the National Young Mathematicians' Awards

Alex Orrow (c) Copyright

Sarina Thind, Megan Lisle, Max Dawkins and Alex Whitford made it to the grand final at the University of Cambridge last Tuesday

A team of pupils from a Bexley primary school have been named runners up in this year’s National Young Mathematicians’ Awards.

The team of Sarina Thind, Megan Lisle, Max Dawkins and Alex Whitford battled through two tough rounds to make it to the grand final at the University of Cambridge last Tuesday.

The competition, organised by tuition provider, Explore Learning and the NRICH Project at the university, saw the team from Hurst Primary School fight valiantly in the final before receiving their runners up prizes.

The main aim of the competition is to encourage children to see the fun that maths can bring and the potential that it can reach while also building confidence.

Paul Grosvenor, marketing director at Explore Learning says: “There has been a real buzz around this year’s National Young Mathematicians’ Awards and we’ve been thrilled with the response from schools, parents and children all over the UK.

“With so many schools having entered the competition, Sarina, Megan, Max and Alex did amazingly well to make it through to the final; their fellow pupils, teachers and parents should be hugely proud of them.

“All finalists did an incredible job to make it to the University of Cambridge and we hope this really instilled a sense of confidence in all the entrants – perhaps there is a future Professor Hawking in our midst.”

The National Young Mathematicians’ Awards is the biggest maths competition for school teams in the UK, open to teams of four children - two boys and two girls - aged nine to 11.

Sarah Mortimer, assistant head at Hurst Primary School said: “There was a really clear message that you don’t have to be a mathematician to use maths every day, and I think it was quite poignant for them.

“A lot of what they learned - problem solving and communication in particular - can be related to real life and they seemed to embrace that opportunity to work together.

“We’re all extremely proud of the children and what they’ve achieved

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Bexley Times

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists