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Medieval structure mill discovered

PUBLISHED: 09:23 19 February 2009 | UPDATED: 16:10 25 August 2010

Greenwich Mill 2

Greenwich Mill 2

ARCHAELOGISTS announced the discovery of a 12th century tide-powered mill by the River Thames on Monday

ARCHAELOGISTS announced the discovery of a 12th century tide-powered mill by the River Thames on Monday.

Museum of London archaeologists had discovered the Medieval structure measuring 10 by 12 metres in Greenwich Wharf last summer. But they only announced the find after their dig was completed and the site covered. It is believed the find marks the capital's earliest discovered medieval tide-powered mill and was constructed in two phases, from prepared oak beams where carpenters' construction marks are still visible. Counting the trees' rings, a process called dendrochronological analysis, was used to date their felling back to the year 1194.

Timber specialist at the museum, Damian Goodburn, even identified the beams as being cut with an axe rather than a saw.

A large fragment of the intact waterwheel was found which would have had a diameter of more than five metres along with an enormous trough to channel the water which was shaped out of a single oak beam.

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