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Sidcup primary school children plant 1000 flower bulbs to stamp out polio

PUBLISHED: 17:14 18 October 2016 | UPDATED: 17:33 18 October 2016

Pupils Chloe, Amber, Sarah, Shahzeb, Priya, Louie, Giselle and Aaliyah with deputy head teacher Andrew Cowley (centre back) and Rotarians Peter Jackson (left) and Graham Cliff. 

Credit: Derek Hope: Kent Photonews

Pupils Chloe, Amber, Sarah, Shahzeb, Priya, Louie, Giselle and Aaliyah with deputy head teacher Andrew Cowley (centre back) and Rotarians Peter Jackson (left) and Graham Cliff. Credit: Derek Hope: Kent Photonews

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The initiative was launched by Rotary International in Great Britain and Ireland (RIBI) to help educate children about the disease

Pupils at Orchard Primary School in Sidcup planted 1000 purple crocus bulbs as part of a project to stamp out polio.

The initiative was launched by Rotary International in Great Britain and Ireland (RIBI) to help educate children about polio - a disease that kills and paralyses young children. For more than 30 years Rotary and its members have been committed to fighting to eradicate polio across the world.

The primary school received a special grow your own crocus pack from the Rotary Club of Sidcup, who chose the colour purple to symbolise the purple dye painted on children’s fingers to say they have been immunised.

Now the crocus bulbs have been planted, pupils who are members of the school gardening club will look after them until they bloom in spring next year.

Rotarian Peter Jackson said:

“The project is a fantastic way for us to engage with school children and their parents about the work Rotarians do both in their local communities and around the world. It will also teach pupils about polio and the devastating impact it still has on children in affected countries.”

Deputy head teacher Andrew Cowley added: “The Sidcup Rotary Club have been of tremendous support to the school in recent years, supporting us through assemblies, fundraising events and in building valuable links with the local community. The children have had tremendous fun planting the crocuses.”


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