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Underwater ironers fly the flag

PUBLISHED: 14:32 04 February 2009 | UPDATED: 16:06 25 August 2010

RECORD: 128 dives braved freezing water to beat the underwaterm ironing achievement.

RECORD: 128 dives braved freezing water to beat the underwaterm ironing achievement.

FORGET Australia Day, stuff surfboards and wax up your ironing board for a truly British experience.

FORGET Australia Day, stuff surfboards and wax up your ironing board for a truly British experience.

Upholding our nation's fine tradition of eccentricity, a group of divers have attained the world record for ironing underwater.

Bubble blowers including father and son Mark and Drew Cunningham, of Maiden Lane, Crayford, braved freezing waters in Gloucestershire to take up the daft challenge last month.

No fewer than 128 divers were involved in trying to smash the record for most divers ironing at once and in the end 86 managed to keep on pressing without drifting away.

Mark Cunningham said: "It's not every weekend that you get to try something different and break a World Record, even if it meant I had icicles forming on my board!"

Ah Mark, you poor crazed fool. We salute your courage.

The previous record was held by 72 Australians who managed to eliminate some creases within ten minutes of each other.

Presumably they had the luxury of ironing in beautiful, clear and warm reef, unlike our own murky sub-zero waters.

"We may not win the rugby or cricket, but we do know how to iron," added Mark, proving that being rubbish at sport doesn't make you less of a man.

The most bizarre world record, according to oddee.com, has been undertaken by a Brazilian who can pop his eyeballs out of his sockets.

Claudio Pinto's antics have staggered scientists and probably scared a lot of children.

He said: "It is a pretty easy way to make money. I can pop my eyes out four centimetres each, it is a gift from God, I feel blessed."

However we were more impressed by 13-year-old Drew Cunningham, who was the youngest diver for the ironing stunt and we suspect won't be making much money himself.

The teenager was proud that the record had been "ripped from the Australians' hands", said his dad, revealing more of that brilliant and worrying competitive streak.

Apparently the St Columba's student could only report that he was very cold, but we believe he's probably thawed by now.

The divers are now waiting for the Guinness Book of Records to verify their bizarre claim to fame, which raised more than £10,000 for the RNLI.

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