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WWI rifleman honoured 92 years after his death

PUBLISHED: 09:42 05 November 2009 | UPDATED: 17:19 25 August 2010

LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND - APRIL 11:  A Liverpool fan pays his respects to those who died in the Hillsborough disaster prior to the during the Barclays Premier League match obetween Liverpool and Blackburn at Anfield on April 11, 2009 in Liverpool, England.  On April 15 it will be the 20th anniversary of the Hillsborough disaster, the bells of Liverpools two cathedrals will ring 96 times in memory of the 96 fans who lost their lives. At 3:06pm, exactly 20 years since the match was abandoned Liverpools public transport will stop for 2 minutes. There will also be a memorial service on the Kop where 96 candles will be lit and a representative from each family will be awarded the freedom of the city.  (Photo by Clive Rose/Getty Images)

LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND - APRIL 11: A Liverpool fan pays his respects to those who died in the Hillsborough disaster prior to the during the Barclays Premier League match obetween Liverpool and Blackburn at Anfield on April 11, 2009 in Liverpool, England. On April 15 it will be the 20th anniversary of the Hillsborough disaster, the bells of Liverpools two cathedrals will ring 96 times in memory of the 96 fans who lost their lives. At 3:06pm, exactly 20 years since the match was abandoned Liverpools public transport will stop for 2 minutes. There will also be a memorial service on the Kop where 96 candles will be lit and a representative from each family will be awarded the freedom of the city. (Photo by Clive Rose/Getty Images)

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A WORLD War I hero has finally had his name etched on a memorial 92 years after his death.

A WORLD War I hero has finally had his name etched on a memorial 92 years after his death.

Rifleman Alfred Thomas Turrell, formerly of Maxim Road, Crayford, of the 10th battalion of the rifle brigade died on June 22, 1917 but his name never made it on the Crayford memorial alongside his two brothers-in-law.

But after the Times revealed the blunder, Bexley council rectified the lengthy omission meaning his child Maude Day, 93, of Moat Lane, Slade Green, will be able to see his sacrifice remembered as the nation salutes Remembrance Sunday.

The mother-of-seven, who grew up in Dartford, said: "I am really pleased to think I know where my father's name is before anything happens to me."

Now the mayor of Bexley will accompany the grandmother to see the memorial with his name on it.

Mrs Day said: "I feel chuffed.

"I can't go to any services this weekend because I am nearly 94 and have a job getting about.

"I hope everything goes well with the services.

"They should be remembered because in WWI soldiers couldn't come home.

"The children don't bother much with the Remembrance services but they should because it is awful not to."

Mrs Day appeared on the front page of the Dartford Times on September 17 when we revealed her moving story.

She has no pictures or memories of her father as she was 15-months-old when he died. Her mother went on to remarry and have another 11 children, who Mrs Day helped look after.

She would walk from the Tree Estate in Dartford to go out pea picking in a field in Wilmington and at 8am go to work at Wallace's nursery and then walk back across Dartford Heath to help her mother with the children.

Mrs Day, who has outlived three of her own children, only discovered that her father, who is buried in the Noreuil Australian Cemetery, Northern France, was not included on the memorial last month when her friend Jim Carlo offered to take her to see it.

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